Difference between "dangerous for" and...

by Uthman
(Tripoli, Libya)

"Smoking isn't good for your health"

What's the difference between,

"Smoking is dangerous 'to' your health.


Smoking is dangerous 'for' your health"?
Hi Uthman,

My first reaction was to tell you that "smoking is dangerous to your heath" is wrong. It sounds strange to me, not natural and doesn't roll off my tongue like "for your health" does.

Before you go and erase this version from your mind, wait. It is strange for me because in Canada, most people use "for", but just because we do things one way in Canada does not mean that people in English, Australia or the states do it the same way.

So I did a little research. Try something for yourself. Type the expression using "to" into Google. Then do it using "for". You will find numerous creditable articles using both expressions.

So to answer your question, both are fine, and as far as I can tell, they mean exactly the same thing and can be used interchangeably.

If anyone knows of a concrete difference, be sure to leave a comment. Have a great day!

- Diana

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