wont , won't

Would you please explain the different between wont and won't? Could you please provide us some examples with as much detail as possible?


We appreciate your kind help and wish you a wonderful day. :-)

Thanks so much, Ola

Comments for wont , won't

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Sep 12, 2012
Won't and Wont
by: Gary

Ola Zur! Best explanation on the internet
Thanks
Gary

Sep 12, 2012
Won't and Wont
by: Gary

Ola Zur
Best explanation on the internet
Thanks
Gary

Nov 19, 2010
wont, won't or want?
by: Ian of Languagewell

Please let me make a comment on this subject.

Usually people have a problem of hearing the difference between won't and want:

I "won't" go tomorrow or I "want" to go tomorrow.

First we have to notice that won't finishes in n't this is the way we make the negative of the verb to be (she isn't, it wasn't, you aren't etc) or of an auxiliary verb (I don't like cheese, Mary hasn't got any brothers, John wouldn't like to win the lottery, etc)

Won't is the shortened negative form of "will", so I won't be at home tomorrow is the same as I will not be at home tomorrow

The pronunciation of the letter O in won't is the same as the O in so or home.

The pronunciation of the A in want is the same as the pronunciation of the vowel in one.

Wont without the apostrophe is an adjective that means accustomed or, more usually, as a noun in the sense of usual custom or usual practice The most common use of this word is:
Mark arrived late to the meeting as is his wont which means that Mark arived late as usual.

OK? I hope my examples are clear.

Nov 19, 2010
Wont or won't?
by: Ola Zur

There is actually a HUGE difference between the two words.

Won?t = will not.

Examples:
I won?t see him again.
They won?t come tomorrow.
She won?t tell me her name.

Wont = a usual behavior.
Usage note: this word is considered formal/old-fashioned. It is not for everyday use.

Examples:
They were out all night dancing, as was their wont.
(Meaning, they were out all night dancing, as usual for them.)

As was her wont, she refused to let me pay.
(Meaning, as usual for her, she refused to let me pay.)

It is his wont to make friends everywhere he goes.(Meaning, he usually makes friends everywhere he goes.)

I hope this clears things up.

Ola Zur is the editor of www.really-learn-english.com, an illustrated guide to English.

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